Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

Laughing all the way to the bank

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Plans to exclude some offsetting projects from the EU's Emissions Trading System, due to be formally approved this month, have been watered down following lobbying by big business. Corporate Europe Observatory has obtained documents which show that BusinessEurope, the International Emissions Trading Association (representing carbon traders), the chemical lobby group CEFIC and some big companies such as Enel, lobbied DG Enterprise to sabotage DG Clima's proposals. The business groups found an ally in DG Enterprise. The ban will prohibit industrial gas offsets, which currently account for more than half of the available credits and are bought by European polluters as an alternative to cutting pollution at home. Read the full article here:
 
There has never been a more important time to ensure that the EU's top decision-makers are free from possible conflicts of interest.
The position of Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission is problematic, concentrating too much influence in one person and undermining other Commission research and assessment processes. We ask Mr Juncker, the new President of the European Commission, to scrap the position.
David Cameron's nomination of a revolving door ex-lobbyist, Jonathan Hopkin Hill, as EU commissioner is bad news for Jean-Claude Juncker's newly-stated commitment to lobby transparency.
Do you wonder which businesses are pushing most for the proposed EU-US trade deal TTIP? Or where they come from? And who has most access to EU negotiators? CEO’s at-a-glance info-graphics shine a light on the corporate lobby behind the TTIP talks.

Corporate Europe Forum