Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

Kangaroo Group's base in Parliament challenged

  • Dansk
  • Nederlands
  • English
  • Suomi
  • Français
  • Deutsch
  • Ελληνικά
  • Italiano
  • Bokmål
  • Polski
  • Portuguese
  • Română
  • Slovenščina
  • Español
  • Svenska

Corporate Europe Observatory has written to the European Parliament's College of Quaestors (the body responsible for administrative matters regarding the running of the Parliament) to question why the Kangaroo Group has an office in the Parliament building. The Kangaroo Group is not a registered Intergroup, nor does it appear to have any other official status vis-a-vis the European Parliament. But members of the group, which include some 50 big companies, including Goldman Sachs, BP and Volkswagen, benefit from the privileged access to the Parliament and to MEPs.

The arms industry uses the Kangaroo Group as one of its lobbying channels to shape EU security and defence policies, via the Kangaroo Group's working group on “Space, Defence & Security”, as CEO has highlighted in its new report on the arms lobby. CEO argues that such activities should not be coordinated from an office inside the European Parliament, and urges the Quaestors to ask the Kangaroo Group to find office space elsewhere.

 
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Corporate Europe Observatory needs to raise €3000 to challenge dirty energy corporations who are trying to hijack the UN climate negotiations this December in Lima (COP 20), building a strong voice to carry through 2015 when governments meet again for the crucial talks in Paris.
An analysis of the revised independence policy of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). More reworded than revised, actually.
The EU's Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada could unleash a wave of corporate lawsuits against Canada, the EU and its member states – including through the Canadian subsidiaries of US multinational corporations. This is the result of an in-depth analysis of CETA’s investor rights by Corporate Europe Observatory and 14 other environmental NGOs, citizens’ groups and workers unions from both sides of the Atlantic published today.
The position of Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission has been discontinued, and the Juncker Commission says it is now reflecting on how to organise independent scientific advice. This is a crucial issue and, together with many other NGOs, we sent a list of principles to the Commission on how to, in our opinion, try to best do this.

Corporate Europe Forum