Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Kangaroo Group's base in Parliament challenged

Corporate Europe Observatory has written to the European Parliament's College of Quaestors (the body responsible for administrative matters regarding the running of the Parliament) to question why the Kangaroo Group has an office in the Parliament building. The Kangaroo Group is not a registered Intergroup, nor does it appear to have any other official status vis-a-vis the European Parliament. But members of the group, which include some 50 big companies, including Goldman Sachs, BP and Volkswagen, benefit from the privileged access to the Parliament and to MEPs.

The arms industry uses the Kangaroo Group as one of its lobbying channels to shape EU security and defence policies, via the Kangaroo Group's working group on “Space, Defence & Security”, as CEO has highlighted in its new report on the arms lobby. CEO argues that such activities should not be coordinated from an office inside the European Parliament, and urges the Quaestors to ask the Kangaroo Group to find office space elsewhere.

 

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The corporate lobby tour

Four months before world governments meet in Paris to negotiate the deal they claim will “save the climate”, 1500 protestors took matters into their own hands by entering an opencast lignite mine owned by energy provider RWE in western Germany.
The stubborn and aggressive imposition of privatisation by Troika goes against the will of Greek citizens and represents a direct attack on democracy.
Publicly, business lobby groups are heavily pushing the idea that TTIP will benefit small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). But behind closed doors they admit the reality: that small companies will “face increased competition” and that “benefits remain hypothetical”.

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