Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

  • Dansk
  • NL
  • EN
  • FI
  • FR
  • DE
  • EL
  • IT
  • NO
  • PL
  • PT
  • RO
  • SL
  • ES
  • SV

Battle For Corporate Investment Rights

New investment powers, granted to the EU Commission under the Lisbon Treaty, will still allow multinational companies to claim compensation when national laws designed to protect the environment or public health damage their profits, according to proposals put forward by the EU Commission this month. The draft legislation on the protection of international investment – an area previously governed by member states – was an opportunity to change the current system under which national agreements frequently give companies investing overseas excessive protection from legislation in the host country. But following an intense lobby campaign from industry and EU member states led by Germany and the UK, the Commission has opted to protect the status quo. The Commission’s proposals will now be considered by the EU Parliament and the Council.
 

Commission refuses to act on the recommendations of the European Ombudsman regarding tobacco industry lobbying.

CEO turns the spotlight on another of the interest groups operating within the European Parliament.

At least one developer of new GM crops – Canadian-based Cibus – has attempted to bypass the European policy process by presenting policy makers with a fait accompli: decisions by individual Member States on the regulatory status of new techniques, as well as prematurely-launched trials of new GM crops.

The biotech industry is staging an audacious bid to have a whole new generation of genetic engineering techniques excluded from European regulations. The pending decision of the European Commission on the regulation of these so-called 'new GMOs' represents a climax point in the ongoing below-the-radar attack by industry on GM laws.

The corporate lobby tour

Stop the Crop

Alternative Trade Mandate